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  • Will Pemble

The Five Reasons Employer Branding Campaigns Fail

Updated: Sep 16, 2021



Employer branding campaigns are a great way to attract new talent, but they can also fail. Your employer brand is the first thing candidates see when applying for jobs with your company and it's important that you make a good impression. In this blog post we will discuss five reasons employer branding campaigns may fail.


#1 - Lack of Brand Consistency


When you are recruiting new talent, your employer brand is the foundation of what you promise to all candidates. This means that it needs to be consistent across every touch point where potential employees can find information about your company.


It's important not only for the employer branding campaign itself, but also for existing and future content on your website or social media. If a prospective employee can 't find a consistent employer brand between the employer branding campaign and existing sources of content, they will likely assume that there is conflicting information or worse - no employer branding at all.


Just like any long term relationship, your employee is going to find out everything about you and your company.


If they can't find what you are promising them in an employer branding campaign, the relationship will likely end before it even begins.

#2 - Lack of Employee Participation


Imagine if you threw a party and no one came! That's what employer branding looks like when you don't get the proper buy-in from your existing employees. Your new employee could flounder and fail.


If you want a successful employer brand, it's important to get your current employees on board. If they can't be excited about the campaign and help recruit candidates themselves, then there is no employer branding at all!


It's not enough that your recruiting team or employer branding agency produces content for social media or external job postings. Those are great first steps, but the work is just beginning.


Everyone in your company has a vested interest in employer branding campaigns - they are going to be working with new hires on a consistent basis and without their support there is no way that your employer brand promises can come true.


Letting new employees down in any way is not an option! Not for them, and certainly not for you.


How do you keep your entire team engaged, communicating, excited, and focused on achieving the company's goals for the year?

#3 - Poor Communication Strategy

If you ask the shipping manager what your employer brand strategy is for this year, how will they answer?


If they don't know, you can be sure that your employer branding is in trouble.

Employer brand campaigns need clear and concise communication to succeed, but this isn't just limited to the external sources where candidates find out about your company for the first time. It's also important that every member of your team knows what employer branding promises


Email blasts, Slack channels, and instagram posts alone will not get the job done.

Employee engagement needs to become a daily ritual. You have an employer brand strategy, now it's time to implement it!


Talk is cheap.


Talk about your employer brand is cheaper. How will every single employee in your company live your brand? What processes, ground rules, and rituals are in place to reinforce your brand? How are they enforced?


Find out the answers to these questions and you'll be well on your way to employer branding success! It may feel like a lot of work, but it's far less expensive than dealing with an employer brand crisis.


This means that you need to let everyone in the company know how important their role is and what employer brand promises they are expected to uphold. The best way for this type of communication strategy to take place is through face-to-face conversations with colleagues or supervisors who can answer questions along the way.


Success is not an event, it's a process!


#4 - Ineffective Employee Onboarding


Does every employee in your organization have a current, written role description? Making your new employee feel part of the team on day one is essential to your employer branding campaign.


A comprehensive 90 Day Onboarding Plan for all new hires - and all new promotions - is the best way to ensure that employer branding promises are upheld on a daily basis.

  • A 90 Day Onboarding Plan should include the following crucial elements.

  • Company Vision, Mission, and Values

  • Company Ground Rules

  • Employee Role Description

  • 30, 60, and 90 Day Goals for the new employee

  • Keys To Success in the company

  • Common Mistakes made in this role

An employee who gets this level of clarity and purpose on Day One is going to feel like they are a valued and important member of the team. by the employer brand.


#5 - Disconnect Between Your Brand Promise and Reality


Your brand is a promise you make to your employees. If you break that promise in any way, it is going to have a negative impact on employer branding.


For example, if your employer brand states that you value diversity and inclusion, but then someone from HR makes an inappropriate joke about another person's background at the company picnic - what do you think new employees will say? That employer branding campaign was not only ineffective in attracting talent because of the comment but it also makes new hires feel out of place.


Your employer brand also goes far beyond how your employees feel about your company.